Thursday, June 14, 2018

Mohs surgery

Two weeks ago today, I went to my new Dermatologist. Going to the dermatologist is not anything new and I never know what to expect every time. This day it was four precancers that were feezed burned and two biopsy's, one on my forehead and one on my left arm. The freezes were on both cheeks, right eye in the corner, and on my right leg. 
Two days later, the nurse called and tells me both Biopsys came back. They are both Basal Cell Carcinoma's with margines so I need to come back . The doctor wants to do Mohs Surgery.
  
Mohs surgery is a precise surgical technique used to treat skin cancer. During Mohs surgery, thin layers of cancer-containing skin are progressively removed and examined until only cancer-free tissue remains. Mohs surgery is also known as Mohs micrographic surgery.
The goal of Mohs surgery is to remove as much of the skin cancer as possible, while doing minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. Mohs surgery is usually done on an outpatient basis using a local anesthetic.
Mohs surgery is an improvement to standard surgery (local excision), which involves removing the visible cancer and a small margin of surrounding healthy tissue all at once. Mohs surgery allows surgeons to verify that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery. This increases the chance of a cure and reduces the need for additional treatments or additional surgery.
So, this morning I drove to Ruston, Louisiana for surgery. Areas cleaned and prepped. After deadening with several bee sting shots to numb the area, Skin is removed and about 3 centimeters. Covered with a bandage and then wait while the skin layer is being examined in the lab. Doctor returned with good news, that the area was clean from cancer cells. Both areas are coitized and burned and then stitched inside and outside. Surgery was done in a couple of hours. I finally was released and will return a week from Monday to remove the stitches.



   
 
     
I will be seeing this new doctor every three months for a while. One day, hopefully. I wont have anymore   basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, as well as some Surgery's, Biopsy's, and other more unusual skin cancers.

2 comments:

  1. I am so sorry you had to go through this but so glad it was successful. Praying for you as always

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    Replies
    1. All margines came back clear. Thank God! Thank you for checking in on me.

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