Blog for a CURE

 Click here Blog for a Cure  to help support Thousands who have CANCER and see who I support.


Facts About Skin Cancer You Should Know! 
  • Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. More than one million skin cancers are diagnosed annually.
  •  Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon. 
  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. The incidence of many common cancers is falling, but the incidence of melanoma continues to rise significantly, at a rate faster than that of any of the seven most common cancers.
  • More than 20 Americans die each day from skin cancer, primarily melanoma. One person dies of melanoma almost every hour (every 62 minutes). The survival rate for patients whose melanoma is detected early, before the tumor has penetrated the epidermis, is about 99 percent. The survival rate falls to 15 percent for those with advanced disease. 
  • Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25-29 years old and the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults 15-29 years old. 
  • One blistering sunburn in childhood or adolescence more than doubles a person's chances of developing melanoma later in life. A person's risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns at any age.
  •  Frequent tanners using new high-pressure sunlamps may receive as much as 12 times the annual UVA dose compared to the dose they receive from sun exposure.


Evelyn H. Lauder Dies Of Non-Genetic Ovarian Cancer
75, founder of pink ribbon for cancer awareness, died today from complications of non-genetic ovarian cancer, which had been diagnosed in 2007, at her home in New York City



What a blessing to read about someone who is beating CANCER! Please visit Mind.Body.Peace and read Kates father's story. And while your there, take time to say hello, look around, and tell Kate I sent you.
Take some time to Read Leahs Cancer journal..

I want to share this wonderful post today from
Please take time to read it and go to her blog and comment. I'm sure you will be as blessed  as I was from her story!
" My Heros: A Cancer Story". written by Jana

For many years I worked in oncology nursing in the hospital setting.  I consider that time the most difficult of my career, yet the most rewarding.  I consider it an absolute privilege to have worked with patients suffering from cancer.  They did suffer too.  Most of my patients were very ill.  Most of them died from their disease.  I was there to see many of them die.  They left a mark on me, but not a scar.  They blessed me to the deepest part of my soul with their beauty, their grace, and their strength. They left me inspired.
I still think about many of those people and their families.  They touched me so deeply.  I just carry them around in a little pocket in my heart.  I am so glad that I had an opportunity to help them in some small way because they helped me in some really big ways.   They taught me about complete and utter honesty and they taught me about hope.  I just wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.
I think about Sally.  Sally had Leukemia.  I really loved her.  She was stylin’, beautiful.  She had an amazing family.  She was full of life.  I walked into her room at 5am one morning.  She was sitting on the edge of the bed, all alone, and weeping.  I sat down next to her and put my arms around her.  We cried together for a few minutes.  Then she sat up, squared her shoulders, literally, and said “There, that is my pity party for the day.  Now I am ready for some coffee.” She was so strong.
I remember Mr. N.  He also had leukemia.  He was very sick.  He was vomiting, his stools were just large amounts of dark red blood.  He was extremely weak and needed a lot of help.  I was helping him back to bed from the commode and he looked at me and said “…is this really worth it?”  I said “There is always hope.”  He died 2 days later but he never gave up.  His family remembered his strength and how hard he fought for them. I loved him.
Mr. S.  made me cry for days and still brings tears to my eyes.   I was working night shift.  He had lung cancer and was short of breath.  He couldn’t control his bowels and he was so sick.  I cleaned him up several times during the night.  He was a very proud Irish guy and he was ashamed.  I just kept reassuring him and treated it as if it was no big deal, even though my heart was breaking for him.  When my shift ended the next morning I went to check on him and let him know another nurse would be coming in.  He grabbed my hand and said “Please don’t leave me”.  But, you know, I had to go.  My husband had to go to work and my kids needed to get off to school.  I had responsibilities.  I left him in good hands but I wish I had stayed with him.  I wish it still. I will never walk away again if someone asks me to stay.
Mr. S. died later that day with his daughter at his side.  Praise God.
There are many more experiences, too many to cite here.  Some are happy stories, some funny and some sad stories; but, I found these people to be nothing short of inspiring.  They faced a great enemy with full armor and I am so blessed to have witnessed their fight.  They are my heroes.

When Team Ra-Ras Kicks Breast Cancer reaches 5 million views, UnitedHealthcare of Pennsylvania will donate $50,000, to the Philadelphia Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure to empower the fight against breast cancer. At 8 million views, UHC will donate another $50,000. For the first million views, UHC has already contributed $100,000 for this inspiring, powerful campaign.


This was posted by Melissa who is fighting Colon Cancer
For your entertainment purposes, to which I find only cancer patients get a kick out of:

Top Ten (plus 2!) Best Responses to Enduring a Colonoscopy:
emphasis“We had to add the extra two, because these are true stories from an unnamed gastroenterology, who swears these comments were actually made by patients while he was performing colonoscopies.”_emphasis_

12. Take it easy, Doc, you’re boldly going where no man has gone before.
11. Find Amelia Earhart yet?
10. Can you hear me NOW?
9. Could you write me a note for my wife, saying that my head is not, in fact, up there?
8. You know, in some states, we’re now legally married.
7. Any sign of the trapped miners, Chief?
6. You put your left hand in, you take your left hand out. You do the Hokey Pokey….
5. Hey! Now I know how a Muppet feels!
4. If your hand doesn't fit, you must a quit!
3. Hey, Doc, let me know if you find my dignity.
2. You used to be an executive at Enron, didn't you?
1. Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?


This is Emily, who I support along with thousands, and this is her story:

My name is Emily, and I'm a 16 year old girl living at home with my parents.
I am very lucky to have been raised in a comfortable caring Christian home for all of my life.I write this little blog from my home in England. I won't say exactly where, but it is nearer the South than the North and nearer the East that the West. I'm originally from Ireland (and miss it so!), but I’m now used to life in England. So you are probably wondering what this blog is about?
For the past few months I started feeling quite ill. I was tired all of the time. I would sleep for 14 hours and wake up exhausted. Suddenly I developed a golf ball shape lump in my neck which turned out to be around a gland. I went straight to see my GP, and at first they thought that it was glandular fever but a blood test revealed that it was a lot worse. I was diagnosed with leukaemia and that is really where this blog begins.
update 4/21/11***I'm a Christian and I'm proud of it. My relationship with God is 100% the most important thing in my life. In 2010 I was diagnosed with Leukemia Cancer and it was only then that I realized how important my faith is to me. At that time I started a blog called 'Emily's Cancer Blog' and I wrote about the highs and lows of dealing with cancer.



Cancer Awareness Colors
Ever wonder what color represents a Cancer type?
Pink-Breast
Teal -Ovarian
Clear-Lung
Purple-Pancreatic
Leukemia -Orange
Melanoma - Black
Colon -Dark Blue
Multiple Myeloma -Burgundy
Brain -Grey
Prostate -Blue
Childhood Cancers -Gold
General Cancer Awareness -Lavender
Lymphoma -Lime Green
Uterine  -Peach
Kidney  -Kelly Green
Sarcoma/Bone  -Yellow
Bladder -
Cervical -Teal/White
Head and Neck -Burgundy/Ivory
Liver -Emerald Green
Esophageal -Periwinkle Blue


My Breast Surgery  December 17, 2010

Hospital called the evening before (Thursday) and scheduled me from 7 to 5 am. Got up at 3 and we left by 4. When we arrived in Shreveport and checked in they didn’t come get me to check in until 6 to put me in a bed. They started the IV and I talked to the Anesthesiologist. Thought I was about to go, but my doctor had his nurse come with a wheel chair to take me to his office on the ninth floor. She said he wanted to insert another tritium marker….What? I haven’t even had anything in that IV yet to calm me and he wants to do this now? He walked in the exam room and said he was sorry, but he wanted to do that and leave a needle in place also. It hurt, believe me. The nurse came back to the room where they were waiting to take me to surgery. The last I knew was that ride down the hall until I woke up an hour and a half later in recovery. When they took me back to the room the doctor had already talked to my husband and had left. He told him he took a pretty big section out and they would cut it up, take a look, and he would call Tuesday or Wednesday.
I’m waiting again! The Hugh bandages are uncomfortable and it burns inside, The incision is nearly all the way across, but other wise I feel ok. My husband has been so sweet, taking really good care of me. What ever the outcome of the news, I’ll have him by my side and loving me no matter what. To those that have been where I am today, I know you understand. I will update as soon as I hear.



December 18, 2010
It was was BENIGN!
Doctors office finally called today and gave me GOOD news. Its beginning to look like Christmas. All I could do was cry afterwards, I guess it had built up waiting after first biopsy abnormal and then having to have surgery last week. He said the tissue sample was large enough to catch the abnormal cells and he will see me Jan 3 for suture removal. I will have to go every so many months for ultrasound, I have a smaller size bra to look for, and I have a good size incision that may leave scaring....but hay, ITS BENIGN! 

I found this post very interesting on a Blog site I follow called A Doctor and a Nurse. Be sure and visit her blog, it is full of interesting things to read and see. This was about Green Tea...She writes.....

What green tea does is literally amazing. It has been shown to have a SIGNIFICANT impact in both preventing and treating cancer.  Studies have shown that green tea prevented the spread of cancer in both breast and lung cancers. Another study shows that breast cancer survivors who drink green tea have a lower risk of recurrence than those who do not drink green tea.  Furthermore studies have shown that drinking green tea while undergoing traditional chemotherapy increases the effectiveness of the chemo. Research shows that green teas are effective in treating and preventing other cancers as well, such as prostate cancer, skin cancer, colon cancer and ovarian cancers.

Please read the rest of her post which can be found on her Blog.....



IF I HAD MY LIFE TO LIVE OVER - by Erma Bombeck
(written after she found out she was dying from cancer).

I would have gone to bed when I was sick instead of pretending the earth would go into a holding pattern if I weren’t there for the day.
I would have burned the pink candle sculpted like a rose before it melted in storage.
I would have talked less and listened more.
I would have invited friends over to dinner even if the carpet was stained, or the sofa faded.
I would have eaten the popcorn in the ‘good’ living room and worried much less about the dirt when someone wanted to light a fire in the fireplace.
I would have taken the time to listen to my grandfather ramble about his youth.
I would have shared more of the responsibility carried by my husband.
I would never have insisted the car windows be rolled up on a summer day because my hair had just been teased and sprayed.
I would have sat on the lawn with my grass stains.
I would have cried and laughed less while watching television and more while watching life.
I would never have bought anything just because it was practical, wouldn’t show soil, or was guaranteed to last a lifetime.
Instead of wishing away nine months of pregnancy, I’d have cherished every moment and realized that the wonderment growing inside me was the only chance in life to assist God in a miracle..
When my kids kissed me impetuously, I would never have said, ‘Later… Now go get washed up for dinner.’ There would have been more ‘I love you’s, more ‘I’m sorry’s.’
But mostly, given another shot at life, I would seize every minute; look at it and really see it; live it and never give it back. STOP SWEATING THE SMALL STUFF!
Don’t worry about who doesn’t like you, who has more, or who’s doing what
Instead, let’s cherish the relationships we have with those who do love us…








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